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"We are the protagonists of our stories called life, and there is no limit to how high we can fly."

Type rated on A330, B747-400, B747, B757, B767, B737, B727. International Airline Pilot / Author / Speaker. Dedicated to giving the gift of wings to anyone following their dreams. Supporting Aviation Safety through training, writing, and inspiration.

Friday, March 18, 2011

Mother Earth

Friday Fabulous Flyer

I received a response from a pilot-writer, Michele Eades, who told me why she couldn’t participate in the “why I want to fly” essay contest. Her reason circled around the Japan crisis and her love of the earth. This morning I heard Prince William say, "Grief is the price we pay for love." Michele knows this as well as anyone.  She is a shy person, with a good heart, and caring soul, who cares deeply about the world and the recent tragedy that has befallen all in Japan. 

Michele said,

“As a writer - I've been personally affected by the tragedy in Japan and find that at this time I'm unable to complete & submit my own entry for the essay writing contest. I wrote 3 pages of a draft for this and have tried to work on it to completion, but to be honest - my heart & soul are much too full of sorrow at what's happening in Japan & what the consequences are for our beautiful earth. My heart & soul can't "get off the ground" with this writing assignment at this time. I saw the images of Sendai airport - water engulfing the aircraft, etc...and so many other heartbreaking's just taken the "wind out of my sails"

I love our earth so very much - and I'm heartbroken to see what the damages are & what's to come as a result of all the abuses & neglect, taking place upon her (the earth). I also love the sky, the planes, etc. But right now, there is no "wind" on my earthly wings to complete the essay I started & wanted to submit.”

“I look back on my childhood in the 1960's and remember very vividly all the beautiful things that influenced me as a little girl. You see, our home is across from a big park. My parents always took me to the park as a little girl and we would fly kites… chase butterflies, watch the birds - things that had to do with nature & flight. All of these things I was sensitive to and loved! My connection to the earth & to the sky as a child in the 1960's became who & what I am as a woman - a "natural earth & sky loving woman". For me, when I see the earth upset - the spiritual chords within my soul react deeply. Also, as a child always looking up at the stars, the moon...I remember nights looking up from my window to see the stars and moon and DREAMING, IMAGINING...always with a very vivid imagination which influenced me to WRITE.”

My last international flight was to Portugal. I was in Lisboa & Oporto. It was a tremendous flight - I loved it! When I'm flying, my spirit & soul open up literally. For me, flying is a passionate & loving experience...and as I mentioned, all of it's personal for me - it's all tied together...”
Michele Eades

Not only do pilots care deeply, but writers and people everywhere are helping.  

Author, blogger, and friend, Heather McCorkle say's, "Led by author Keris Stainton, a generous group of authors is auctioning off everything from signed books to manuscript critiques. The proceeds will go to relief efforts in Japan." There is something there for you!  
Please visit:  Authors For Japan

Remember to slow down and enjoy each and every moment... you just never know if it's your last. 

Enjoy the journey!
~ Karlene


  1. What an incredibly sad and inspiring post Karlene! Michele sounds amazing and I hope she gets the wind beneath her wings again very soon. We are defined not by how many times we are knocked down, but by how many times we get up. Thank you for the link to my post on Authors For Japan. You are so sweet!

  2. Can never underestimate the nondiscriminatory power of nature, just how fragile we and all that we make and build really are. I'm sure Michele will fly soon, all the best to her.

    I will look up the link, a great cause, the images on the news every day break my heart.

  3. Sometimes life is just overwhelming. I'm hoping for Michelle to get the wind back under her wings soon. We'll all be looking for glimmers of beauty in Nature to come after this terrible time, and doing what we can to make the bad things less. Thanks for the link, Karlene.

  4. Karlene: Thanks. I found (most) the detal that I was looking for on tranoceanic etc.
    I also found your 3-13 post and the awful weather. But still, almost 200 women and girls turned out. Impressive, to say the least. Since one simply does not fly small aircraft in bad weather (Especially with almost 200 guests on hand!!!) it was a great opportunity for some hangar flying. For the women and older girls, I suspect that it was also a powerful lesson about weather; YES! It does matter, especially with those little airplanes. I know that you will have better luck the next time that invite your flyers and their PAX to another event. Frankly, I'm glad that most of your pilots called in,"Not available, weather related." It demonstrates that you have a safe, cautious and prudent group flyin these ladies around Renton. Good works and yes, Plan B is a good thing.

  5. Good advice, Kar. Let's enjoy and be thankful for what we have, let go and let God for the rest. The whole earthquake and tsunami and nuclear disaster really got to me, too. My niece gets so upset by what we have done to the earth that she forgets to enjoy the present. I wish I knew how to help her be okay and live in gratitude for the present. XXX

  6. Karlene san,
    Thank you for sharing inspirational post:)
    I got power from your writing.
    I am sure if I share this to my family and friends,they will absolutely got power:)

    Best regards to Michele san:)
    Thank you again for kind words.
    We won't give up and we are appreciate international very very nice help and their cheer up words:D

    Have a wonderful day:)

  7. Heather you are so right... that is how we're defined. We just have to keep getting up. I will keep remembering that. You're welcome... I hope everyone goes to your link!

  8. Thanks for the comment Linda. She will get the wind back in her wings... if she chooses too. There are things we don't have the choice... if an earthquake wipes out home. And others we do, by how we decided to live, think and react.

  9. Craig, Thank you so much for the great comment! Yes, there calling in "Not Flying" was a good thing. We will fly again, and the weather will be good. I'm glad you found what you were looking for. It's hard to keep track of me... let alone my posts.

  10. Thanks for the comment Kathy. Your niece just needs to decide she has a choice of how to think. And, those people who believe that we are killing our earth and can feel the pain... then they need to realize they are part of the global consciousness and their thoughts are aiding in the demise of the earth. Power of thought is amazing. We need more of that, not the woe.

  11. Karlene, You are both serious and hilarious. I love your posts, even more - your responses. When you book is ready, be sure to let us know. I'm expecting a great reading experience.
    While I don't want to beat this to death, Standing-Down on the 13th was a Very Smart Choice. I do not need to list the many reasons. Most of those young women will return when a late spring or summer event happens. You know that it will happen and that the youngsters will return. Kids simply do not forget those events. Eveer!
    My first flight in a 'small' airplane was ca.1963-64,in a government-owned Beaver, equipped with floats and wheels (we used the wheels.) It was only a quick loop to test some minor something and I laster learned that the flight was made for my benefit. (Thanks, Uncle Sam!) It was a never-forget event, much the same as many of your young women will experience. I was happy to see a couple of Beavers represented in your last event and some extra-special thanks to those owners for participating. A stndard Beaver eats more than twice the fuel of a small twin and even warming the engine is an expensive operation. That so many Beavers are still flying is testament to their great design and one Very Serious Engine. When that modest diameter prop turns, it moves some substantial air! As noted, a never-forgotten event. Next time, we'll talk about the CFI, a Mooney, the father of a H.S. girlfriend and a very senior captain at NWA. Yes, all rolled into one. One impressive pilot! (When I got to about 150 hours, mostly as his expense, he allowed his daughter to fly with me. A Seriously BIG event.) With , I am glad that I did NOT wed that dear woman, but she and her dad have remained dear frends for >>40 years. When 'Pilot Dad' was finally forced to retire, the 60-rule, his seniority number was a single digit. He could win bids for any schedule or city pair that he wished and managed to stay home for all of the important events. Save the 'one airplane at a time rules,' he could fly anything in NWA's fleet. "Captain G." is still with us, now aged 86 and he remains a dear friend. His daughter is also a friend and I remain rather proud of my choice to NOT wed her. Forty-one years later... this is too long.
    Thanks for the super blog. It makes some women fly and that is a really good thing.
    *No response is necessary* and you are welcome to delete or edit as necessary. Best wishes and please keep flying those kids. [Someday, you might find some room for a few boys, too.] -C.


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