Contract Airline Services


"We are the protagonists of our stories called life, and there is no limit to how high we can fly."


Type rated on A330, B747-400, B747, B757, B767, B737, B727. International Airline Pilot / Author / Speaker. Dedicated to giving the gift of wings to anyone following their dreams. Supporting Aviation Safety through training, writing, and inspiration.

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Cessna T210...

My Next Plane!?!
In my search for the next plane I initially thought about buying an A36. So I posted Should I buy a Beechcraft? Daniel commented, "I think the A36 is a great airplane and would fit your mission well. My only gripe is that they are a bit overpriced compared to other airplanes that can do the same thing. Compare their price with Cessna T210s. You won't find a more comfortable, versatile single engine airplane though. The Bonanza is a great plane."
So during my last drive to Bend and I decided it was time to buy a plane. And I thought... what about the T210? This search brought me Dan Howard aircraft sales. I found the plane I fell in love with, but it was already in contract. Below is that plane. Check it out and you'll see why I wanted it. 


I reached out and told them what I was looking for and the debate between the two planes. My concern were the comments on the ADs on the T210. I received the following email from one of the salesmen.


Bob:
"I have sold plenty of both, A36s and 210s. Overall cost of ownership will remain lower on a 210 and there are not any outlandish ADs to worry about. The last AD to be published was for a wing spar inspection that begins at 5000 hours. It was published about a year ago and there have been thousands of 210s that have gone through the AD inspection. 
Not one has been found to have a crack in the SPAR since the AD was published. It was published in the first place based on a couple airplanes in Australia and one in Canada and they were all very high time birds with one having over 20,000 hours.
N77RE
They were being flown low level constantly and put under a lot of stress. Since the wing AD, I have sold one 210 with 12,000+ hours and one 85 R model 210 with 15,000 hours. The R model was an oil company airplane that was mainly used for pipeline patrol (low level flying) and it had no cracks in the SPAR and was in great shape.

I am pointing these things out so that you don’t worry so much about the wing AD as it was a bit of an over-reach by the FAA. Not unusual for the government to over-reach. In 14 years of business, Dan Howard Aircraft Sales has sold about 800 airplanes and over half of them have been 210s. 
I have been with Dan in a selling role for about 12 of those years. We keep selling these 210s in the U.S. and globally, so they hold a strong position in the single-engine piston market for good reasons. They are unbeatable for their overall performance numbers when it comes to speed, weight carrying and CG, cost of ownership, resale value, etc. 
The last T210 that I took up high was a 75 T210L that was loaded to the gills. I was selling it to a 777 captain and we went up to 24,000 feet. At 65% power we were showing a true airspeed of 193 knots and we were burning 17.5 gallons per hour. They perform just as strong at full gross weight as they do with less." 
What do you think? 
Which plane do you like? 

I am on my way to China today, the land of no blogging! So, if you don't see your comments, or I don't reply, that's the reason why. I'll be home on Saturday afternoon and we'll catch up then. Until then, Thank you for your thoughts. This is a huge investment and I want to get the right plane. 

Mission: Fly to Bend monthly. Fly Angel Flights. Race in the ARC next year. Fly to airshows with my books. And fly in our next year's Fly It Forward event, giving free flights to children of all ages. 
Enjoy the Journey...
XO Karlene

Author of Flight For Control and Flight For Safety,
If you haven't read them...it's time!

23 comments:

  1. Karlene, I say I like the 210. This would be the best bet in my personal, humble, professional opinion.

    The blessing of a pilot is that we are constantly on the go. Have a safe trip to China and look forward to hearing from you upon your return.

    Regards from overcast and cool NY.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And we will have a plane to fly when you come out to visit!! Yes, we are on the go...but when we get in the plane... it's calm.

      Delete
  2. The Cessna T210 is a good airplane. I looked at one (and still might go there when I want to upgrade. It is cheaper than an equivalent Bonanza (to purchase), although I disagree that it will cost less to operate. It will cost about the same as an A36TN (turbo). Check out the back seats thought, if you plan to carry grand-kids. The A36 wins there, with its club seating and higher useful load.

    I suggest that you make a table of the things that matter to you, and compare the T210 and A36TN (not fair to compare a turbo Cessna to a non-turbo Bonanza!), weight them by importance and see which aircraft wins out.

    BTW, my second aircraft is a Cessna......

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think I need the turbo on the A36... the 210, probably. The club seating is great... but I'm thinking the kids will want to look out the windows and the low wing won't be as beneficial as a high wing for that. Thank you so much for your input. I'm still in debate...but we're getting closer! And... will have a plane within a couple months I suspect.

      Delete
    2. I don't think there's much difference, the rear seats in the Bonanza are behind the wing, and the pilot's head is aligned with the leading edge. So the pilot's view is far better in the low wing - apart from directly downwards. For seeing other traffic the low wing Bonanza beats a high wing Cessna hands down. I hope you choose the Bonanza, so I can do your transitional training! :)

      Delete
  3. Karlene, as you know I am a "Cessna guy", having flown a 182 for about 10 years. I know the Bo's only by reputation. That disclaimer out of the way, I think you'd be very happy with a good 210 given the mission's you've described. For one thing, entry and egress will be much easier compared with the Bo', and that counts for Angel Flights, and for us as we age. The visibility from the high-wing platform will be a treat when you do "discovery flights" with kids. You'll be able to cart along a LOT of books with minimal CG worries. And if you have any friends who are, um, a bit large, all the Cessna interiors are roomy -- I understand Dwane Wallace was a big guy and the DNA flowed forward from the 140!

    If you plan on flying in some weather, I can tell you that the 182 is a rock-solid instrument platform and I expect the 210 will be the same. Given normal wx in the Pacific NW, that's a plus for you.

    Whatever your choice, you can't be 'wrong' with either of these airplanes. But I'd go with the 210.

    Best regards,

    Frank

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Frank, Thanks so much for your comment. I was thinking about the high wing for the kids to look out, but had not thought about the entry egress for Angel Flights. That might just be the kicker there to push me over to the Cessna. A huge impact. And at 5'12" myself, the more roomy is a good thing too. And stable... yes! We like stable.
      Thanks for the input!

      Delete
  4. Check out the Cessna 206. Great utility. Why is Cessna still making the 206 but not the 210? I don't recall if the 206 came in a pressurized version if that is one your list of requirements. The wing struts put less load on the spar and they are great to use a step on to check the fuel. With the 210, you'll always need a ladder.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had not thought of the 206. I like the fact I can pull the gear up on the 210... but I had not thought about the ladder and checking the fuel. I can't stand on the struts? Good point!! Thank you so much. I'm looking at a 206 now!

      Delete
  5. I don't know much about planes but I say go with what is most comfortable and easiest to fly. And I say, stop by next time you're in the area.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Heather. I've been driving past your town on a rush to and from, with minimal time. This way I could fly in to Redmond. We could have lunch and I could go on to Bend. So much fun and it would buy me time in my life that I don't have now. Yes... this is a must!

      Delete
  6. I flew a C210L for 25 years and it was my darling, my workhorse. What caused issues? Bubbles in the brake lines that stuck where the main gear pivot at extension/retraction. Not much else. My most favorite 210? The 1986 T210. Perfect balance on the controls and a beast of an airplane in the most wonderful way. If you can find one that is the airplane.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Amy, Thank you so much!!! Okay... 1986 is it. My kids were born in 1983, 1984, and 1985. I think the next baby should be 1986!!! lol And you can teach me how to fly her????

      Delete
  7. Oh, what fun! As a long, non-current pilot, I have no real opinion here. I like Frank's ideas and of course, you must have a full IFR panel. (Seattle - Duh?) Space and weight are important and the grand kind do not shrink. Ha! Another aviation author in your neighborhood drives a Queen (King?) Air. Why not bet the house and buy a family sized turbine twin? OK, I'm teasing; got to have two more good books, first. More seriously, always take a second look at the maintenance costs - and match every log entry to a bill. There are differences. Will your airline give you a handsome discount on a smaller, regional turbine twin? Whatever works, Granny, Go For It. and learn all you can about flying whatever you buy. Those super singles are not A330s... The shopping has got to be tons of fun for you. Regards, -Craig

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The shopping is tons of fun! I really liked what Frank said too. It helped. And I looked into a 206... they are beautiful and frightfully expensive. Especially the new ones. Now... time to shower and fly!

      Delete
  8. You know...

    Get the T210. I'm with Jeremy. If you are asking to select one of the pictures, I don't know which one.

    I'm sending the Word docs right now.


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I just flew with two pilots who said this is a super expensive plane. So now I don't know what to do. Still in the search phase!

      Delete
  9. I don't mind 761TL at the bottom there. Nice paint scheme. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was thinking the same thing! We would look good flying it... right? :)

      Delete
  10. Karlene -- Frank v H brought your quest to my attention (I'm NOT selling my 210)....and I typed a bunch of words by they somehow evaporated when I hit "publish". Please feel free to drop me a note at xml167 at yahoo dot com and I'd be glad to speak with you by phone to share some thoughts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Scott, Thank you so much. I will email you!

      Delete
  11. Don't know where D.B. gets that low-wing is better for spotting traffic than high-wing. I always found the most crucial traffic spotting time was turning from base to final, which puts the low-wings right in the way of the view of approach traffic.

    One thing I always liked about high-wings which no one else mentioned is that the wing protects you from weather as you open the door to climb into the plane. It does occasionally rain in the Seattle area doesn't it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it's better for spotting other aircraft if they are above you. But... when a little plane cut me off on my solo flight I had a high wing and saw the plane under me. Would I have with the low wing? Not sure. Lol... yes, it does rain and that is a GREAT point! Thank you so much for the comment!!

      Delete

Thank you for your comment! If your comment doesn't appear immediately, it will after I land. Enjoy the journey!